Front Counter Closures

The police front counters at the following locations (shared with local authorities) are closed to the public until further notice.

We continue to have officers based at these locations, but we will not be able to meet the public without a prior appointment.

  • Elmbridge Civic Centre
  • Epsom Town Hall
  • Woking Civic Centre

Find your nearest police station

If you are required to answer bail, you must do this in person at any police station or front counter.

If the police station or front counter is closed you may use the yellow phone outside, but you will not be recorded as having answered bail unless you speak to our Contact Centre.

If you are unable to answer bail due to self isolation because you, or someone you live with, has symptoms (not social distancing) please use the online "tell us about" form in plenty of time before your bail is due.

To present documents after your vehicle has been seized, you will need to attend any Surrey police station between Monday to Friday, 08:00 to 21:00.

You can find your nearest police station here.

In order to allow us to keep our emergency lines open to those who have no other way of contacting us, we’d be grateful if you can report non-emergency crime using the online reporting system.

If you do not have access to the internet, you can dial 101, or use the yellow phone outside police stations.

In an emergency where a crime is in progress or a life is at risk, always dial 999.

Other non-essential services

In order to support our front line, we are reviewing the following non-essential services for the foreseeable future:

Travelling to a Police Station to register for the first time, or to report a change in circumstance has been deemed non-essential whilst social distancing measures are in place.

Please do not attend a Police Station to register as a foreign national or to register a change in circumstances.

The Home Office are aware of this decision and your visa conditions will not be affected.

If you wish to register please email PoliceRegistration@surrey.pnn.police.uk or call 01483 639516 and provide your details, the team will get in contact with you to re organise attendance when normal service is resumed, or alternatively check back here for further advice in the coming weeks.

Further advice on registering as a foreign national

Travelling to a Police Station to obtain fingerprints for non-EU visa and work permits, or for certain passport applications, has been deemed non-essential whilst social distancing measures are in place. As such we request that you do not attend a Police Station to do so.

Please keep checking our website to see when this restriction has been lifted.

Further advice on fingerprints

We are currently considering the impact of Covid-19 and social distancing on firearms licensing, firearms license renewals and the associated home visits. We will update the website once a decision is made.

We will not be hosting or attending any "meet the beat" or similar community engagement events for the foreseeable future. You can keep up to date with our local teams on Facebook and Twitter, or by joining InTheKnow.community.

Surrey Police Facebook Pages:

Surrey Police Twitter Pages:

Crime prevention

While the current situation is bringing out the best in many of our communities, we are also expecting a rise in some specific crimes as a result of the measures bought in to combat corona virus:

Frequently Asked Questions

The restrictions that are being bought in to stop the spread of Covid-19 are unprecendented, and in some cases we are still understanding what can and can't be done to enforce them.

Please check back frequently, as the advice is liable to change as the situation develops.

Essential and non-essential Travel

You are asked to avoid all non-essential travel, including avoiding travel to and from work if at all possible.

The government has anounced that, from 30 March 2020, MOT due dates for cars, motorcycles and light vans will be extended by 6 months. This is being done to help prevent the spread of coronavirus.

Further information on gov.uk

Vehicles that are due an MOT before 30 March (and may not have completed that due to the owner self isolating) are subject to different guidance.

This is not a policing matter, however we have been asked this question a number of times. Our advice is, if at all possible, you should avoid moving house.

If you are legally committed to moving house (for instance your tenancy has come to an end or you have exchanged on a property) it may be difficult to delay.  We advise speaking to all the parties involved as soon as possible to try and avoid the need to move.

Our road safety and speed checks will continue as long as we have the resources to support them.

Speeding and other road safety checks are an important part of our approach to preventing road collisions - the most serious of which would put extra strain on the NHS at a time when it is already under extreme pressure.

Social distancing and self-isolation

The advice to stay at home, and avoid people is there to save lives, reduce the impact on the NHS and protect our loved ones.

British policing is founded on respect and engagement with the public. We resolve issues daily by talking to people and reasoning with them and that will continue.

However, if people are non-complaint with the regulations, we will be enforcing them, as the public would want us to. This includes dispersing groups of more than two people. Those who refuse will face a fine.

If you are concerned about groups of people, this would count as anti-social behaviour and can be reported online.

The local authority environmental health and trading standards officers are responsibile for enforcing the regulations requiring businesses such as pubs, cinemas and theatres to close.

You can report businesses that you believe should not be open to

Do not call the police to report that you are self isolating or that you are infected with Covid-19 coronavirus.

If you are unable to answer bail due to self-isolation because you, or someone you live with, has symptoms (not social distancing) please use the online "Tell Us About" form in plenty of time before your bail is due.

For more information on what to do if you suspect you may have corona virus, visit the NHS 111 website.

If you are contacting us about a policing matter we may ask if you are self-isolating in order to manage the risk to officers and staff who may attend.

Coronavirus Bill and new policing powers

We are working around the clock with local partners to respond to the coronavirus emergency.

The new policing legislation allows police to act in support of public health officials and enforce the government's guidelines around public safety amid the coronavirus pandemic.

We will continue to take the existing approach to explain and engage with members of the public in breach of the new rules but policing powers will be there for officers to enforce as a last resort.

These FAQs will help you understand the new legislation, why it is being put in place and how it is going to be enforced.

The new Coronavirus Bill provides police officers with the power to take people they suspect of having Covid-19 to be tested. It also provides the government with the power to prohibit events or gatherings and to close or restrict access to premises.

 

The Coronavirus Bill is designed to help save lives. The  measures don't prevent people from leaving their homes but during the emergency, nobody should leave their premises unless they have a reasonable excuse.

The new legislation provides Public Health Officers with the power to quarantine those who have tested positive for COVID-19, or those they reasonably suspect have the virus. It would also provide police officers with powers to take people they suspect have coronavirus to be tested or assessed by Public Health Officers.

Section 21 of the Coronavirus Bill provides Public Health Officers the power to quarantine those who have tested positive with, or those they suspect have COVID-19.  It also provides police officers with powers to take people they suspect have coronavirus to be tested.

Section 22 of the Coronavirus Bill provides the UK government with the power to issue directions prohibiting any event or gathering. It also provides the government with the power to close or restrict access to any premises.

The new legislation gives UK governments the power to issue directions prohibiting any event or gathering. It also provides UK governments with the power to close or restrict access to any premises.

Police will disperse groups of more than two people, except where they are from the same household. Those who refuse could face a fine under new legislation. These measures are here to save lives and we hope the public will adhere to them.

The legislation has been introduced to prevent, protect against, delay or otherwise control the spread of coronavirus. It will also allow the most appropriate deployment of medical or emergency personnel.

The government has been clear that it expects people to do the right thing in order to protect the NHS, which will save lives. The vast majority have done so. These powers will support officers in dealing with those who have not yet fully understood the gravity of the situation. The Bill makes it an offence to organise a prohibited gathering, which would be punishable, on conviction, by fine.

The fine is £100. Individuals will be informed about why they’ve received a fine, how they can pay it, and what the consequences of non-payment are. They should immediately go home if they have received a fine, or they can be taken home where necessary to do so. Receiving a fine isn’t a criminal offence and won’t require a court appearance if paid. For those who continue to not follow the guidance, the fine can be doubled each time and summary prosecution can be sought for those who refuse to pay or comply. The £100 fine can fall to £50 if paid within 14 days.

Direct enforcement will apply to adults only. For those under 18, officers will encourage, and ask that responsible adults ensure their children comply with the government request. If those adults fail to protect their children by complying with the regulations, they may be given a fine, and escalation of fines, as they are responsible for their children’s actions.

It is vital that we make best use of current and every day policing powers in addition to any new legislation. This includes dispersal powers and community protection notices contained within the Anti-Social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014, and closure powers under the Licensing Act 2003.

In line with the way we police most situations the emphasis should be on engaging, explaining and encouraging first, with enforcement being an absolute last resort in our tactical options. Officers are encouraged to be as visible as possible in these uncertain times for the public.

Ensuring for officer and staff safety is paramount. Officers will have PPE available to them if they feel they need to use these and should be following PHE guidance for frontline workers in how they conduct their interactions. Supply of PPE is being managed and we ensure officers have the kit they need. We expect most interactions will only be verbal, even when having to issue fines.

Police powers will be used where appropriate and with restraint. Our most effective power is our ability to engage with individuals and our communities to explain the important of following and abiding to the government's advice and the new rules, recognising that this is a significant shift from normality for everyone. The measures taken have been brought in to protect the NHS and save lives.

The police have a duty to protect life and property; prevent and detect crime; maintain the peace and activate contingency plans where there is a threat to life. We will continue to do this and we are working hard to ensure officers have the kit they need.

These new measures are there to save lives and protect our loved ones. We will be enforcing them, as the public would want us to. Follow the advice, stay at home and help us to help the national effort.

The current Government guidance is that you can travel to outdoor open space irrespective of distance. You shouldn’t travel with someone from outside your household unless you can practise social distancing - for example by cycling.

We will be talking to people on the streets. The vast majority of people will be out there for a legitimate purpose, but we will have to ask about people who aren't, and if people refuse to comply with rules, then we will enforce them.

Officers are working hard to keep us all safe from the full range of crimes in what remain challenging circumstances so we would ask everyone to work with us and remember that if you need our help we are here for you. You should continue to report crimes by calling 101 or visiting the Surrey Police website. Always dial 999 if a crime is in progress or in an emergency. Breaches of Covid-19 legislation can continue to be reported via the Surrey Police website.

Personal responsibility is now key - for those who are able to leave their homes as a result of the changes, think carefully about where you are going and how you will be able to keep your distance from others. Keep in mind the purpose of the regulations and the national effort to protect the NHS and save lives.

Officers can only enforce Health Protection Regulations. Government guidance such as two-metre distancing, avoiding public transport or the wearing of face coverings in enclosed spaces is not enforceable.

We will continue to engage, explain and encourage people to follow the rules, using enforcement as a last resort.

Officers do not want to use their enforcement powers, but it is right that they’re able to take action against those who disregard the remaining restrictions and in doing so, put people at risk.

Police still have a role in other social distancing measures - where people are gathering in groups with those not in their household or if they’ve left their house for one of the reasons not designated as a reasonable excuse.

The short answer is no - although the reasons for being outdoors have now been widened, and there are differences between advice given in England compared to the rest of the UK.

We will positively engage with the public as we have been doing for the last two months. The focus for police is now narrower - on those activities which are now not lawful or which are not listed as a reasonable excuse for being outside.

People should only be travelling for allowable reasons, and in those cases where travel is unrestricted there are no limits to travelling long distances.

We will use common sense and discretion to determine what’s reasonable.  Officers will engage, explain, encourage and, only as a last resort, enforce.

We trust the public to be honest with us and to continue engaging with us positively, as they have been to date - but of course officers will be inquisitive where necessary.

Everyone has a responsibility and a civic duty in respecting the terms of this lockdown. Thousands have tragically lost their lives, and we would expect a degree of maturity from the public in continuing to observe the new rules. Most have been very sensible, and we thank them for the personal sacrifices they’re making.

We won’t start counting households – that isn’t practical or a good use of our time. But where we see clear breaches, we will act appropriately.

If officers are out and about, they will engage, ask questions to establish circumstances, and will then explain the regulations and encourage those breaking the rules to go home. We will only enforce as a last resort. 

Officers will be focusing on those activities which are now not lawful such as gathering in groups or which are not listed as a reasonable excuse for being outside – such as going on holiday.

As things slowly return back to normal, yes, we would expect to see a return of things we have come to experience in the past. Ultimately, any changes to regulations from now will mean more people are out and about. We are ready to meet any increase in demand, at whatever pace it comes. As ever, we ask the public to stay vigilant, and keep reporting crime to us.

No, that’s government guidance not regulations.  People need to take individual responsibility for following the guidance.

It is now perfectly legal for people to travel to beauty spots.  People must be responsible, follow government guidance and maintain social distancing.  We also urge people to keep in mind the purpose of the regulations and the national effort to stop the spread of the virus, protect the NHS and save lives. 

If there are groups not of the same household, there may be still be a role for police – in engaging, explaining, encouraging and, only as a last resort, enforcing.

Yes, because that is a not a reasonable excuse for being outside your home.  We will use common sense and discretion to determine what’s reasonable.  Officers will engage, explain, encourage and, only as a last resort, enforce.

All freshwater anglers must be in possession of the relevant Environment Agency fishing license.

You should only travel to fishing venues with members of your household and must observe social distancing.

Make sure you have permission to fish before travelling. Many clubs and fisheries have implemented booking systems. Fishing without permission is illegal.